Syn.: Aiolon canadense Nieuwl. et Lunell, Anemone dichotoma var. canadensis (L.) MacMill., Anemonidium canadense (L.) Á. Löve et D. Löve, Nemorosa canadensis Nieuwl.
Family: Ranunculaceae Juss.
Anemone canadensis
Distribution: North American species found from Northwest Territories across Canada and in US in a wide area south of Great Lakes and in a narrow strip from Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico.
Ecology: Open forests and wet areas of grasslands in elevations from 200 to 2800 m. Blooms in June and July, which is later than Anemone multifida.
Anemone canadensis
Description: Perennial herb with stems 20–70 cm tall, from caudices and rhizomes. Basal leaves 1–5, 4–10 × 4–7 cm, palmately divided in 3–5 lobes, each with 3 serrated tips, prominent veins, petioles 10–20 cm long; stem leaves similar, sessile. Flowers terminal, solitary, sometimes 2 or 3, peduncle long, hairy, 3 leaf-like bracts, flowers white, 2.5–3 cm across; sepals 5–6, petal-like; stamens and pistils numerous. Fruit is an achene, 3–6 mm long, pointed, fruiting head globe-shaped.
Threat and protection: This species is listed as endangered in Connecticut, Maryland and Tennessee.
Note: Native tribes used the crushed leaves and roots as poultice and brewed a tea to stop nosebleeds and to treat sores and wounds.
Anemone canadensis
Anemone canadensis
Anemone canadensis
These images were taken in Canada, Alberta, Calgary, Confluence Park (spring and summer 2013 and 2015).