Syn.: Geranium bicknellii var. longipes Fernald, Geranium carolinianum var. longipes S. Watson, Geranium nemorale var. bicknellii (Britton) Fernald
Family: Geraniaceae Juss.
Geranium bicknellii
Distribution: Northern American species – from Alaska and Yukon through a large part of Canada and north part of USA to Quebec, New England, Tennessee and northern California.
Ecology: Woodland, roadside, waste areas, weedy, but hard to find. Blooms in June to August.
Description: Annual to biennial herb. Stems 20–60 cm tall, decumbent to erect, sticky-haired, spreading, branched. Leaves are opposite, 2–7 cm across, palmately divided into 5 wedge-shaped lobes. Flowers are solitary or in pairs, borne in leaf axils. Flowers 8–12 mm across; sepals 5, sharp pointed; petals 5, pinkish, sometimes rose; stamens 10; pistil 1. Fruit is a capsule about 2 cm long, splitting from the bottom upward, similar to many other Cranesbills, seeds long tailed.
Usage: The roots of this plant, rich in tannin, make an astringent tea that can be taken to treat mouth and throat sores, urinary problems and intestinal diseases.
Threat and protection: Listed as endangered in American states of Connecticut, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island.
Geranium bicknellii
Geranium bicknellii
Geranium bicknellii
These images were taken in Canada, Alberta, Calgary, North Glenmore Park (July 2012).